Coming to the Stage

With many meetups and conferences taking place online through pest past year, all my experience is based in the online world. Often, I would stand in my spare room, talking at an empty screen. That is vastly different to the in person experience I have just described.

In the hopes of dispelling some fear and myths of those others who, like me until recently, have only presented online, I regale the experience of my first in-person meetup. I will discuss the key differences between these two formats. Finally, I will give some useful tips to help you prepare to step out into the physical spotlight and give your first in-person talk.

Let The Record Show

Recording yourself is hard! Recording yourself is downright uncomfortable! Nevertheless, with us all working from home for the past year it has become a more common format for conference talks. Here I regale the lessons I’ve learned from creating my first pre-recorded talk, as well as some right daft tales of getting it wrong, to ensure that your first recording experience goes more smoothly.

The Great Impostor

When we were young, we relished the opportunity to pretend to be someone else. In our current roles, being someone we think we are not feels far more stressful.

Through my own career journey, including breaks from active software development for maternity leave and roles in Scrum Mastery and tech management, and discussing similar experiences with others, I’ve found there are points where the presence of that lurking impostor feels more prominent. Here I discuss the times where impostor syndrome can be particularly hard to manage, using my own and others experiences, and some learning tips to help silence the faker.

All Together Now

Two heads are better than one. But what about three heads? That is indeed the question I was pondering ahead of a recent mob review.

Here I regale the tale of using a mob review to educate myself and other developers in review standards and best practices, and how they can be used as a health check for team review behaviours and psychological safety.

Mix It Up

Sometimes in life, two unexpected elements can combine together to form something better.

Here I discuss how combining behavioural specifications from BDD and e2e testing can help provide a common testing understanding between developers and non-technical stakeholders. I also showcase a brief example to reinforce how behavioural specifications make the user perspective clearer within your tests.

Poker Face

Gamification of Scrum Learning Using Scrum Delegation Poker Scrum Masters and Agile Coaches play a key part in the development and supporting of Agile practice within Scrum teams. Both hold key responsibilities to support and educate teams in the ways of the Scrum force. However, sometimes more than talking needs to be done to helpContinue reading “Poker Face”

Eight Days a Week

Reflections on the Pitfalls of Story Points and Velocity Capture Many don’t know this, but I studied mathematics for two years at university before specialising in Computer Science. One mandatory class specialized in teaching the fundamentals of mathematical proof. In a nutshell, we learned how to establish that a given hypothesis was correct, or identify theContinue reading “Eight Days a Week”

Why Won’t We Change?

Exploring Reluctance in Automation of Manual Development Practices When building software for clients, a key driver is providing value and improvement to current manual user procedures. We should always look at ourselves in the same light. Without eliminating the manual processes in our own software engineering practice, how can we advocate the same lean focusedContinue reading “Why Won’t We Change?”